Winter in Iceland

restingmountain-blogWe’ve been here two weeks so far, our second journey into Iceland.  Only two weeks left and it doesn’t feel like enough.  A week of museums and swimming and soaking and meeting people in Reykjavik, and now a week in a long blizzard in Siglufjordur.  Anxious to get outside I made some photographs with some wings that have been in process for quite sometime.  Seagull feathers collected in 1999 in Seattle and dyed and made into a sculpture…the sculpture existed for awhile and then I decided to take it apart…and carry it to Iceland…logical.  Working on some things during the storm, we’ll see what happens as we move on tomorrow.  The blizzard felt like I was in a fog loosing my direction here…but I did need to work on things.  I just feel a little wilted if I can’t get outside everyday here and walk around.  One evening I when out in the blowing snow and made a snow dome or caldron as we called it.  We filled it with fire the next night and filmed it.  I don’t know what it’s for or why, but that’s what I do here…I just follow a long with impulses, use whatever I can find.

Past, Present, Future in-process

I haven’t been really connected to the verbal side of my brain, as I edit and sort through ALL the Iceland-made photographs, working on bringing a group to completion.  It feels like an exercise of keeping the past in the present, but in many ways the calm I felt in Iceland seems to slip away from me with all the day-to-day needs that  distract me.  Why haven’t I written more?  I think a way to pull back my ‘Iceland calm’ into my day-to-day is to carve out a dedicated daily time to write….where do I squeeze that in?….My brain feels stretched in opposite directions, with eyes-wide looking examining and eyes-inside writing.  But like the entire project, I’ll just keep looking for balance, and just keep going to find it.

but anyhow….thinking and working and planning towards the future, too.  In a crazy leap and many small/big things lining up perfectly, we (paul, mandy, hazel) have bought tickets to return to Iceland in January, when plane tickets are $200.  To make work in the dark,  the snow, to freeze crocheted fiber to create structure, to climb on huge ice chunks, to take pictures by fire and Auroras….I am making work for my future too…glacial ice-colored huge thick knits.  Flamingo feathered wings.

Here is a peak at upcoming finished work….I feel a sense of calm in moving pixels and seeing something permanent emerge from a hour of frantic play between Paul and I at Djúpalónssandur, in what seems like long ago but also right with me.

I want transformation…

Earth, isn’t this what you want? To arise in us, invisible? Is it not your dream, to enter us so wholly there’s nothing left outside us to see? What, if not transformation, is your deepest purpose? (Rainer Maria Rilke)

Stones and poppies

Stones and poppies

My heart open cracks….Pain, I guess, is what it takes to find a new way.  No wonder so many of us choose to turn to stone.

I am still stuck in a deep hole, but my work, even if playing with the petals from today’s flowers and tomorrow’s stones, and bits and pieces around the studio, and the backyard’s sun, it is still the way I build the ladder out of the hole.  Even if I cannot see the light at the top.  My persistence, even if blind….I cannot stop it.  And it will get me somewhere, some location I don’t yet see.  These petals, from Paul’s poppies, will rot, but today I saw every surface and treated them with care.  This light was mine, and something was completed.

Guest Artist Conversation with movement artist Keely Isaak Meehan, 8/19, 4pm

Tomorrow, Friday 8/19, from 4pm – 5:30 pm, please join me at The Project Room for a chat (with treats) with multi-media, movement and dance artist Keely Isaak Meehan, founding artistic director of Manifold Motion.  We’ll be talking about her work, including watching some of her favorite films of her performances, as well as talking about her work as a Certified Movement Analyst.

I asked Keely to come in and talk with me for a few reasons, first and foremost as part of my artist interview series for Solstenen project, talking with people I want to learn something from.  And with Keely there are definitely  several things I want to pick her brain about!

I met Keely in 2008 while I was working on the film/live performance The Silvering Path, with Haruko Nishimura and Ian Lucero.  Haruko had invited DAE supporters to a series of crochet parties we held to generate some of the raw material for my Slug Princess wearable, and Keely was one of those people who returned again and again.

Slug Princess party with DAE

Slug Princess party with DAE

It wasn’t until the performance that I really realized she too was a performer and spearheaded Manifold Motion, when she and her husband media artist Mike McCracken began telling me about a massive production in the works all about a forest of fabric.  Having just made a forest of fabric, I was intrigued!

A few months later, Keely and I began this very funny meet-up of each hunting for yarn colors at thrift-stores for our respective projects and trading with each other what we had found, a bit like addicts of some sort.  And then many months later, seeing “Wool Gatherer”, I was, yes, drawn into the environment they had created, but was more drawn in by the precise yet fluid movements of Keely’s choreography.   I’ve always wanted to know more about her, and also how she manages to wrangle all that is involved in running her own performance company.  I have always been impressed with the scope and professionalism of MM, and their very well thought out fund-raising efforts and showcases, so their performers can eat.

Then an email from Keely in 2010 opened up something else.  She was enthusiastically letting everyone know she was now Certified Movement Analyst in Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals.

“I have found the past two years of study to be hugely transformative. I have learned so much about myself and the world around me, and gained clarity, precision, and ease in my movement and communication. In my final research and presentation I focused primarily on applying LMA/BF to neuromuscular re-patterning for integrated, functional movement.”

As an artist, with the intensely labor intensive work that I do, I am always wrestling with pain, and knowingly perform damaging repetitive movements to get the massive installations done.  Sometimes it feels like a war between my own stamina and the images my mind comes up with.  I try my best to remember my body in the process of making, but when push comes to shove for a deadline, I will work through deep pain.  I know it isn’t good, and somewhere somehow, I will need to (or be forced to) find balance.  I have deep relationships with chiropractic, acupuncture, yoga and any number of patches and ointments, but what it comes down to is, what I do is punishing my body.  Keely spoke with such enthusiasm about her new work, I was so curious about what she had to offer, particularly in terms of seeking a balance,  and because I am not at all familiar with Laban.

“I bring together my training in movement analysis with my background in dance and other somatic movement practices to identify, understand, and help re-pattern tension holding and movement habits. “

 

“…we will find ways to more balanced cycles between Stability/Mobility, Exertion/Recuperation, Inner/Outer, and Function/Expression.”

But time and life have sped by and we have not yet explored anything together.

With my new work I am beginning with Solstenen project, my body and my relationship to physical and psychosomatic gravity are at the center of it, as well as ‘punishing/penance’ as themes.  It seems time to seek out new and other ways of examining my body, and come to terms with the idea of creation and punishment I seem to hold in my bones.  So it is time for me to discover some ideas about Keely’s skills as a performer, maker and movement analysis.  Please join us for an informal conversation, if you are curious too. I’m so looking forward to learning things I don’t even know I don’t know….. I hope this can begin to help me unpack some of my deeply felt identification with A.S. Byatt’s character in the story “A Stone Woman”.

Stone Lungs, 2011

Stone Lungs, 2011

Tessa Hulls: guest artist working…

Writer/Artist/Adventurer Tessa Hulls will be painting in The Project Room for the next few days preparing for an upcoming show of her highly detailed gouache paintings inspired, in part, by her travels.  If you have stopped in to TRP the last week, you might have seen her hard at work.  Her show opens on August 5th at Evo’s Timesinfinity Gallery, at 122 Northwest 36th Street, Seattle from 6-9pm, so she will be working extra hard, because she is also preparing to head off to Antarctica to work in a research station kitchen.  The ‘Adventurer’ title is no joke.

Tessa will also be a part of a round-table discussion I will be hosting very soon here at TPR about “Artists That Interview”, on August 8th at 4:30pm 7th at 1pm, along with Sharon Arnold, Saskia Delores, Joey Veltkamp and Amanda Manitach.  Since I’m incorporating the interview format into my Solstenen project learning process, I want to pick these brains, and just hear about what brought them to incorporating interviewing into their art practice.  Though I don’t have a broad understanding of this, it seems to me just one more example of creative people filling a void in the Seattle art/creative world that needed filling.  We’ll find out more…

I met Tessa when she approached me about an interview for Redefine Magazine surrounding my recent show at Roq La Rue Gallery, ‘Honey and Lightening’.  When she came to my studio, I was really almost taken aback at how much she had researched my work, and her attention to detail, and willingness to draw out some difficult things to articulate.  Her article brings to the surface small details that are significant to me, but quite subtle and usually overlooked.  It was a marked difference from some of the off-the cuff writing I have seen about myself in the press over the years in Seattle.  I know that is a particular approach, to not research the artist, but the inaccuracies have been bizarre to read!  So I want to know why and how she does this, and maintains her connection to her own work and a connection to a wandering life as a compulsive traveler.  Each of the other artist/interviewers on the panel have a very different approach to the process of digging deeper into an artist’s work and process, so I am looking forward to stretching my own abilities as I begin to use this tool to learn about why others make what they do.

Anyhow, come visit Tessa as she works here during the open studio hours at TPR; M, W, Th, Fr. 10:30 am – 2:30 pm.  Tessa usually is in around 11am…

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Thanks for coming to the opening Solstenen Community Crochet Party on July 14th!

Community Crochet 7/14/11

Community Crochet 7/14/11

The Project Room and the Solstenen project opened last Thursday July 14th with a crush of warm feelings from supporters and people excited about the new energetic art space on Capital Hill.  I saw many people I’ve met through my crochet parties from the past few years, many artist friends and art supporters, and some people just curious about the lively activity going on inside!

Tessa, Anne, Julia

Tessa, Anne, Julia

Thank you to everyone who stopped by, and for some really generous donations of new materials to work with (some very special handmade garments/linens I’m looking forward to dyeing and deconstructing and reconstructing!)

Jenifer Ward, Paul Pauper

Jenifer Ward, Paul Pauper

One thing I hadn’t realized until people started coming in and I was setting them in motion crocheting;  usually at crochet parties I am a lot farther along in a project and I have an agenda/need (“need more thick ropes, need round parts, need ruffles”).  This crochet party was essentially the very first stitch of this new work, literally.  I was shrugging my shoulders, ‘the concepts are developing, so please just enjoy crocheting’, was about all I could say.  Take pleasure in the materials, think of it as doodling or drawing, just play.  Usually this messing around for me is done alone, in private.  The first shrug of my shoulders, I felt a bit vulnerable, ‘shouldn’t I know?!’.  No.  It all starts this way, all generative work, not knowing.  Especially with this work, I want to fend off the external and internal impetuous to ‘know’ everything, especially with the environmental installation component of the project to take place in Iceland.  I want to respond intuitively to a place I find; yes, with thread and ropes of time spent where I came from, like the baggage we literally and figuratively drag everywhere.  But still to push and push to stay in the moment of the environment.

Jennifer, Aurora

Jennifer, Aurora

So thank you everyone for just diving in; it seemed people were excited to just be with the process and be with each other.

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And Thank you Project Room family Van Nostrands and Smiths. This is what it looks like to give birth to a baby and open an experimental art center in the course of 30 days!

Jess opening doors

Jess opening doors

There is a subtext to many of my discussions about this project of mine, about blending daily life, family and a passion for ideas and making.  I really feel quite privileged to get to watch Jess Van Nostrand kick ass at this delicate dance we do to carve out a place where we can do what we need to do feed our work.

Erin, Troy, Jen

Erin, Troy, Jen

Much gratitude!  And please join me again on Tuesday July 19th, 3:30-7:30pm, as we do it all again!